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Treasures on Display at Bobby and Steve's Auto World Classic Car Show

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On: Thu, Jul 29, 2010 at 9:09AM | By: Sherry Christiansen


Treasures on Display at Bobby and Steve's Auto World Classic Car Show

It was a glorious Saturday afternoon in Minneapolis, Minnesota June 24th, 2010. Car owners and enthusiasts were getting geared up for the 10thannual Bobby & Steve’s Classic Car Show. Hoods were propped up while car owners kicked back in the shade. Nearly every vehicle on the premises was worthy of being featured. Three cars in particular were brought to my attention and the respective owners were able to pass along some interesting information about their prized possessions.

There were just a handful of Hot Rods at the show. It was the 1930 Model A 5-window coupe that first caught my attention. This steel machine with the 9 inch Ford rear end and B&M 350 transmission rested comfortably upon a set of shiny Boyd Coddington rims. It had rumble seats that folded up out of the storage compartment as well as a TCI frame with 4-link suspension. The hot rod’s owner, indicated that the car will push 1100 RPM at 60 mph and that she runs really nice at 90 mph no vibrations. The car was purchased two years ago in Rhinelander Wisconsin. Named “FreeBird”, primarily because of the meticulously designed eagle graphic that is painted upon the rear axle, this vehicle has participated in as many as 30 shows in 2 years. FreeBird took 1stplace in Center City, MN at this year’s Roadhouse Bar Auto Show.

A 1970 Pontiac GTO convertible, owned by Jim Martini, was another one of the highlights. Mr. Martini purchased this mostly restored magnificent muscle car in 2001 for $22,000. Over the last 9 years Jim finished the job by doing some trim work and handling some other details, like the visors and the crown molding. This car, gorgeous and powerful as it may be, is all about the options. Only 330 1970 GTO convertibles were made with air conditioning. It also had PPG tinted glass, cruise control, tilt, AM/FM radio, power steering, power brakes, power trunk release, and rally gauges. The original MSRP of the vehicle was $4,911; $1,300 covered the options that were specified. This classic beauty has an estimated present value of around $79,000. However, that just leads to the next logical question, why would anyone choose to sell it? This GTO took home the sponsors choice trophy at the event.

Quite possibly the most visually striking vehicle, and my personal favorite was a 1959 Cadillac Coupe De Ville, owned by John Eisele. This brilliant Cadillac was purchased for around $14,000 in 2004. After quite a bit of refurbishing, it is worth about $80,000, possibly more. The car’s exterior was nothing short of remarkable. The House of Color turquoise paint with Cayman flakes shimmered beautifully in the sunlight. Just acquiring the paint itself was no easy task. It had to be purchased in three different states in order to collect enough to cover the 5000 lb beast. The car itself came straight out of Tupelo, Mississippi. The previous owner was Vice President of the historical society in Tupelo. The story goes that he was in the process of restoring a civil war mansion when he decided to part with this Caddy. It was either this or a 1961 convertible that was to be sold to raise money for the mansion’s restoration. In the words of Mr. Eisele, “She floats, even at 110 or 115 (mph) it’s just like you’re sitting in your living room. It’s very comfortable”. Mr. Eisele would have to be satisfied with a top 30 trophy, in spite of the fact that this was one of most captivating cars in the competition.


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