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An Open Letter To Acura

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On: Fri, Oct 17, 2014 at 9:56AM | By: Lou Ruggieri


An Open Letter To Acura

For those of you old enough to remember, Acura, the luxury brand of Honda, decided to take a plunge into the world of performance cars.  They toiled for years over what to build, how to execute it, and if it would be a success. Well, in 1991 the NSX debuted and although you didn't hear it here first, the NSX was a raging success. The result of all that hard work? An all-aluminum-bodied, mid-engined sports car boasting a Honda-built V6 making nearly 300 horsepower (in 1991 that was a lot) with a max engine speed of nearly 8,000 rpm. Honda employed arguably the best designer in the business, and maybe even the best ever. Want proof? The next time a Pininfarina-styled NSX passes you on the highway and you nearly snap your neck trying to place it in the archives of your brain's automaker catalogue, ask yourself if that car looks like it's from 1991. 

There were subtle updates Honda made to the NSX over its tumultuous production run—In 1995, the NSX-T bowed, bringing us a Japanese supercar with a removable roof. Granted, the ability to pop the aluminum top off of your NSX did cost the car about 100 pounds of structural reinforcements, but as anyone that has driven a convertible down a balmy beach highway, the wind in your hair is well worth its price, however it is determined. Not to mention the fact that even with an additional hundred pounds or so, the NSX could still rip off high four-second 0-60 mph runs with ease while posting incredible handling numbers due to its remarkable balance, and, oh yeah, let's not forget that Honda-build quality backing the whole thing.

The last major update to the NSX as we knew it was in 2002. This redesign was essentially just a facelift, as almost all of the moving parts were carried over from the previous model. But, the 2002 version did look quite a bit different, most notably due to the removal of the old pop-up headlights in favor of more aerodynamically friendly fixed, or "non-pop-up", lamps as they were also called until people got used to them. The front and rear facias, side sills and skirts were all tastefully redone in the name of aesthetic evolution. Sadly, in 2005 the last NSX rolled off the assembly line due to low sales, only a few hundred per year for the last couple years. It doesn't take a business genius to do the math on that kind of return on investment.

So we've established that the NSX was a very amazing car in its time, and we have been waiting for its successor ever since. In 2012 Acura unveiled its new NSX concept model and it set the world afire. We are promised a hybrid V6 making tons of power (think 500+hp), all-wheel drive, mid-engine, GTR-like acceleration while sporting a 'Coke bottle' styled body that harks back to the C3 Corvettes, yet another draw. So, okay… Where is it? For three years we have been taunted with this fantasy car and it's been pulled away. So please, Acura, Honda, whatever you want to be called… Please, let's get this car going, huh? No more concepts, no more spy shots, no more taunts, no more nonsense. It's time to have the actual rubber meet the actual road. So please, Honda, can we have our NSX back?


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testerblog | 5:17PM (Thu, May 26, 2016)

There were subtle updates Honda made to the NSX over its tumultuous production runIn 1995, the NSX-T bowed, bringing us a Japanese supercar with a removable roof. Granted, the ability to pop the aluminum top off of your NSX did cost the car about 100 pounds of structural reinforcements, but as anyone that has driven a convertible down a balmy beach highway, the wind in your hair is well worth its price, however it is determined. Not to mention the fact that even with an additional hundred pounds or so, the NSX could still rip off high four-second 0-60 mph runs with ease while posting incredible handling numbers due to its remarkable balance, and, oh yeah, let's not forget that Honda-build quality backing the whole thing.



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