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Most Stolen Car Of 2011...1994 Honda Accord

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On: Thu, Aug 30, 2012 at 2:37PM | By: Chris Weiss


Most Stolen Car Of 2011...1994 Honda Accord

Triple-digit speeds, smoking tires, sexy female accomplices in even sexier sports cars - these are the images of auto theft popularized by Hollywood and pop culture. And if you needed confirmation that they're purely fiction, just take a look at the new National Insurance Crime Bureau's Hot Wheels report. The most stolen car last year was a Honda Accord...from nearly 20 years ago.

If Hondas wasn't so darn reliable, 18-year-old Accords might be virtually non-existent. But it's just that reliability that makes them available to criminals nearly two decades after rolling off production lines. And, in opposition to the glamorous auto theft of popular culture, thieves are snatching them up more than any other car.

The Hot Wheels report has the 1994 Accord in the number 1 most stolen spot of 2011. The NICB says it's the only report that examines all theft data as reported to law enforcement without regard to a vehicle’s insured status.

If you think there's a Chevy Corvette or Camaro waiting in the two spot, you're wrong. That spot is reserved for another Honda - the 1998 Civic. Other mundane, older vehicles like the 2006 Ford Pickup, 1994 Nissan Sentra and 1991 Toyota Camry round out the top 10. In fact, the only sporty car in the group is the 1994 Acura Integra.

Rampant theft of old cars of modest value might seem incredulous to those unfamiliar with the Hot Wheels report, but it's quite common. The 1994 Accord was also the most stolen car of 2010 and 2009, and it was followed by Civic and Camry models in both years.

While its results aren't surprising to anyone that's followed it for more than a single year, the Hot Wheels serves as an annual reminder that any car, not just the flashy red coupe with chromed-out rims, can be stolen. And while some older models dominate the numbers, NICB says that there is an increasing number of late-model thefts, despite advancements in anti-theft technology on newer cars.

NICB President and CEO Joe Wehrle explains: "Today’s vehicle thieves are typically professional criminals who have figured out how to get the key code for a specific vehicle, have a replacement key made, and steal the vehicle within a matter of days. We are aware of nearly 300 thefts that took place in the first three months of this year in which we believe replacement keys using illegally obtained key codes were used to steal the vehicle. We are working closely with our member companies, law enforcement, and the vehicle manufacturers to track these illegal key code transactions and stop the thefts or recover the stolen vehicles before they can be resold here or shipped out of the country to be sold overseas."

On the plus side, the NICB's press release says that overall theft for 2011 should be lower than 2012, based on preliminary data from the FBI's crime statistics. Theft for last year could be at the lowest level since 1967.

Check out the NICB's press release below for more information, including some tips on protecting your vehicle.

PRESS RELEASE

NICB Names 10 Most-Stolen Vehicles for 2011

Key Code Thefts a Growing Concern

DES PLAINES, Ill. –The National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) today released Hot Wheels −its list of the 10 most-stolen vehicles in the United States. The report examines vehicle theft data submitted by law enforcement to the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) and determines the vehicle make, model and model year most reported stolen in 2011.

See the full report at www.nicb.org.

For 2011, the most-stolen vehicles* in the nation were:

1. 1994 Honda Accord

2. 1998 Honda Civic

3. 2006 Ford Pickup (Full Size)

4. 1991 Toyota Camry

5. 2000 Dodge Caravan

6. 1994 Acura Integra

7. 1999 Chevrolet Pickup (Full Size)

8. 2004 Dodge Pickup (Full Size)

9. 2002 Ford Explorer

10. 1994 Nissan Sentra

Each year, NICB reviews all NCIC vehicle theft records to produce its national and state lists of the 10 most-stolen vehicles.

The top 10 places were evenly split in 2011 with five belonging to foreign brands and five to U.S. automakers. Most popular models among the domestic brands were Ford, Dodge and Chevrolet pickup trucks each holding one spot with the Dodge Caravan and Ford Explorer rounding out the domestic models. Hot Wheels is the only report that examines all theft data without regard to a vehicle’s insured status −if a vehicle was reported stolen to law enforcement, it is captured in this report.

Once again, 2011 is on track to continue the national vehicle theft decline. Preliminary 2011 FBI crime statistics indicate a 3.3 percent reduction from the 737,142 thefts recorded in 2010. Vehicle thefts have not been this low since 1967.

“While overall thefts continue to decline, we are seeing a trend toward increases in the thefts of late model vehicles −ones that are theoretically harder to steal due to sophisticated key code technology,” said NICB President and CEO Joe Wehrle.

“Today’s vehicle thieves are typically professional criminals who have figured out how to get the key code for a specific vehicle, have a replacement key made, and steal the vehicle within a matter of days. We are aware of nearly 300 thefts that took place in the first three months of this year in which we believe replacement keys using illegally obtained key codes were used to steal the vehicle. We are working closely with our member companies, law enforcement, and the vehicle manufacturers to track these illegal key code transactions and stop the thefts or recover the stolen vehicles before they can be resold here or shipped out of the country to be sold overseas.”

For more on key code thefts, watch this video.

Even one theft is one too many if it happens to you. NICB urges motorists to follow its “layered approach” to auto theft prevention. By employing these simple, low-cost suggestions, people can make their vehicles less attractive to thieves.

NICB’s four layers of protection are:

Common Sense: Lock your car and take your keys. It’s simple enough, but many thefts occur because owners make it easy for thieves to steal their cars.

Warning Device: Having and using a visible or audible warning device is another item that can ensure that your car remains where you left it.

Immobilizing Device: Generally speaking, if your vehicle can’t be started, it can’t be stolen. “Kill” switches, fuel cut-offs and smart keys are among the devices that are extremely effective.

Tracking Device: A tracking device emits a signal to the police or to a monitoring station when the vehicle is stolen. Tracking devices are very effective in helping authorities recover stolen vehicles. Some systems employ “telematics,” which combine GPS and wireless technologies to allow remote monitoring of a vehicle. If the vehicle is moved, the system will alert the owner and the vehicle can be tracked via computer.

Considering a used vehicle purchase? Check out VINCheckSM, a free vehicle history service for consumers. Since 2005, NICB has offered this limited service made possible by its participating member companies. Check it out at: www.nicb.org/vincheck.

Anyone with information concerning vehicle theft and insurance fraud can report it anonymously by calling toll-free 1-800-TEL-NICB (1-800-835-6422), texting keyword “fraud” to TIP411 (847411) or by visiting our website at www.nicb.org.

About the National Insurance Crime Bureau: headquartered in Des Plaines, Ill., the NICB is the nation’s leading not-for-profit organization exclusively dedicated to preventing, detecting and defeating insurance fraud and vehicle theft through data analytics, investigations, training, legislative advocacy and public awareness. The NICB is supported by more than 1,100 property and casualty insurance companies and self-insured organizations. NICB member companies wrote over $339 billion in insurance premiums in 2011, or approximately 80 percent of the nation’s property/casualty insurance. That includes more than 94 percent ($156 billion) of the nation’s personal auto insurance. To learn more visit www.nicb.org.

* This report reflects stolen vehicle data reported to NCIC in 2011. No further filtering of information is conducted (i.e., determining the total number of a particular make and model currently registered in the U.S. for comparison purposes). For purposes of this report, full size pickups include half ton and larger capacity models for all makes.

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