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Those Who Cast Stones

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On: Fri, Apr 9, 2010 at 8:48AM | By: Benjamin Roussey


Those Who Cast Stones

Sixteen million dollars may not be that much, but with an industry that barely escapes with razor thin a margin, that’s a hefty speeding ticket. Toyota Motor Company is the company in question and they were clobbered with a record-breaking penalty.


Toyota, which was once sparkling clean, has been inundated with bad press. They are facing mounting private lawsuits and, if they pay this $16.4 million penalty levied against them from the Transportation Department, it could be a tacit admission of guilt. With that said, the public knows that many lawyers are greedy and are known for ambulance chasing. Is that the case here? There have been some individuals who have made complaints against Toyota but it has been proven they fabricated the story, made fallacious accusations, and has blatantly lied. For instance, your car is not going to stop quickly enough, in most cases, if you never attempted to press on the brake

The Transportation Dept. charges Toyota for concealing a “dangerous defect” with their widely driven Camry and Corolla. This federal agency says Toyota should have notified officials before customers began to narrowly escape accidents and when Toyota first realized there was an issue. Toyota has about two weeks to ponder their response.

This fine is the most the government could penalize them with. But more fines could be down the road as their investigations march forward. Some people want to see Toyota hit with stiffer penalties. What these people fail to realize is that this company uses this money to employ Americans. Toyota has been very resourceful with their capital. Can we say the same about the U.S. government which is basically bankrupt? California is virtually bankrupt and the city of Los Angeles is almost insolvent, as well. So we have city, state, and federal governments in our great nation that seem to not understand fiscal responsibility. The money that the federal government accepts from Toyota- will they allocate it as responsibly as Toyota would?

Toyota has already decided to recall more than 6 million of its vehicles; this is just in the U.S. Overall, that recall number is over 8 million. Their cars seem to have acceleration problems and the Prius hybrid has braking concerns. Apparently, some of the pedals tend to stick, which afflicts about 2.3 million Toyotas. Toyota is losing a lot of money on this effort, so why should they pay more when they already pay taxes in the U.S. and each of their employees pays income taxes and about 5-10 addition taxes? Speaking of taxes, taxes on everyone are going to rise since too many Americans think they are entitled to everything. That is what Greece thought, now they are in dire straits. A logical question results: should we fine our own politicians for mismanaging our hard earned money? And, this mismanagement has cost American lives.

Now, Toyota is not exempt. Supposedly some people have perished because of their car’s faults. Is this true? Perhaps the driver was speeding or trying to turn his music up so he could listen to Ice Cube more clearly. Toyota could prove this just as easily as the driver could prove it was an inanimate object's fault?

How many moving parts are in a car? They are brilliant and astonishing machines. Why can't people accept that this can happen in such a complex machine? If Toyota lied about, they will suffer because people will not buy their cars again, but their competitor's. This is the ultimate punishment. And then next year GM will make a similar mistake and the complainers, oh, I mean customers, will return to Toyota.


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RoadKill | 8:58AM (Fri, Apr 9, 2010)

What kind of fines did Ford get for putting faulty tires on the Explorers?



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