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Filming Yourself Destroying The Law Is Never A Good Idea, Bugatti Veyron Edition (Video)

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On: Sat, Feb 18, 2012 at 12:51PM | By: Chris Weiss


Filming Yourself Destroying The Law Is Never A Good Idea, Bugatti Veyron Ed

Last week, a video of a Bugatti Veyron doing over 200 mph on public roads hit the Interwebz. Many of the auto blogs did a write-up on the video and it went viral, racking up over a million views in about a week. The video shows the Veyron hitting speeds of up to 200 mph. No dash-mounted Go Pro footage, the video is the result of a well done and elaborate set-up of in-vehicle footage cut with roadside footage from a network of cameraman.

When I first came across headlines, I thought: 'Why would anyone shoot themselves blowing the speed limit apart and post it to YouTube?' That's about as dumb as all the wannabe criminals that show up on the endless iterations of "World's Dumbest Criminals." You're basically begging for trouble from the authorities.

Well, not surprisingly, the video has garnered the ire of Arizona law enforcement. While it doesn't look like there's much the state can do, you can expect them to be on the lookout for this particular Veyron. The owner had better make sure his paperwork, driving habits and vehicle equipment are all on the level.

According to its YouTube description, the footage took place both in Arizona and Mexico, with the 200+ runs south of the border. Still, Arizona authorities are none too happy that their roads may have been used as testing grounds for track-only type speeds.

Neither the full driver or license plate appears clearly in the video, and the footage was reportedly taken in 2009. There's not much the authorities can do about this particular incident, but they have threatened to throw the driver (or presumably any driver) in jail for repeating the type of speeding depicted in the video.

Bart Graves, an Arizona Department of Public Safety spokesperson, didn't mince words when speaking to Reuters: "We have these clowns do this from time to time. They don't care about what could happen. They just want to toot their own horn. If he's rich enough to own a car like this, he's rich enough to rent a racetrack in Tucson or Phoenix."

According to Arizona statute 28-701.02, "excessive speed" in a non-school, non-business/residential zone is defined as exceeding 85 mph. Of course, most roads have lower limits, and Arizona law also defines the maximum speed limit on non-urban stretches of interstate highway as 65 mph. Those guilty of violating the statute are guilty of a class 3 misdemeanor.

The actions shown in the video also appear to violate statue 28-707, which defines "racing on highways" as "A person shall not drive a vehicle or participate in any manner in a race, speed competition or contest, drag race or acceleration contest,test of physical endurance or exhibition of speed or acceleration or for the purpose of making a speed record on a street or highway." A violation there is considered a class 1 misdemeanor.

Ironically, an Arizona Highway Patrol officer actually pulled the Veyron over. No citation was issued; they were going 80 mph at the time.

If I were these guys, I'd find somewhere outside of Arizona to drive my Veyron. And I'd consider never releasing a video like this again (or driving that fast on public highways for that matter).




Comments

reply

Stephy21 | 2:27PM (Mon, Feb 20, 2012)

The video sucked until the end when he was pulled over, funny but why in the world would you post this to the internet and the location where you did it at.


reply

Sami18 | 3:56PM (Mon, Feb 20, 2012)

Why in the world would you put this on the internet your just asking for trouble.



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