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The “Electric Corridor” From San Francisco to Los Angeles

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On: Fri, Sep 25, 2009 at 1:35PM | By: Geoff Ciesla


The “Electric Corridor” From San Francisco to Los Angeles

Commuters on Highway 101 can now make stops at electric charging stations between San Francisco and Los Angeles. So far, five have been installed between the two major urban areas giving further momentum to the renewable fuels movement. They are believed to be the first of their kind.

From Wired.com:

"SolarCity and Rabobank claim the 240-volt, 70-ampere stations unveiled today at five locations along Highway 101 provide the fastest recharge time available in a public setting, allowing EV drivers to charge up in one to three hours. The stations are located in retail areas, and Rabobank is letting people plug in and charge up at no cost."

As of now, Tesla Motors power each station, so if you happen to own a Tesla Roadster you're in luck. Although, when a standard is adopted the stations will be fitted for a universal plug allowing access to any electric vehicle. But what will you do for three hours while your car is charging? Have to remember that this electric highway is in the beginning stages, and with new technology, charging your electric vehicle will undoubtedly get quicker.

As with all batteries, charging takes time, but the people over at MIT are working on an experimental battery that can charge rapidly compared to the normal lithium ion batteries. Hybrid vehicles of the future will be able to recharge in minutes rather than hours. thanks to this new type battery. For more information on that, take a look at ars technica.

While most of the charging stations get their juice from the grid, one of the stations gets its power from a 30-kilowatt solar array. Combining solar with electric vehicles results in virtually zero emissions while driving. According to Wired.com each station costs $7,000 to $12,000 to install. Probably cheaper than the conventional gas station.




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